zaynsbro:

This tweet is so accurate.

zaynsbro:

This tweet is so accurate.


"You’re like sent from some other planet."

"You’re like sent from some other planet."

"You’re like sent from some other planet."

"You’re like sent from some other planet."
themaefive:

axonsandsynapses:

yuletidekarkat:

dannygayhealani:

creatingaquietmind:

the speech impediment of the 21st century (by Marc Johns)

I’ll fuck you up buddy this is not a speech impediment it’s linguistic evolution!! the existence of the phrase “Aisha was like” allows the speaker to convey whatever Aisha said without making the listener assume they’re quoting Aisha directly while still maintaining the FEELING of what Aisha said.
ie, Aisha said she didn’t want to go out with me VERSUS Aisha was like, “I’d rather kiss a Wookie”.
the addition of “XYZ was like” lets the speaker be more expressive and efficient and it is a totally valid method of communicating information!!

With the way language has evolved, this is one of the few ways I can even think of to express in casual conversation what someone said. 
"So I said to Aisha," is certainly used, but if you remove the "so," which implies casual tone ("and" can be used in the same way), you get
"I said to Aisha," which is really formal in most English dialects/variations. I don’t know about all, but in New England dialects, you sound like you’re reading aloud from a novel.
"I told Aisha," is really only used when you continue to describe, not tell, what you told her. Ex: "I told Aisha that James was too punk for her" works while, "I told Aisha, ‘James is too punk for you’" crosses the line back into formalness of the "I said."
Things like “I asked” or “I answered [with]” are similar levels of casual and efficient to the “So, I said [or say, as many conversations about the past take place in present tense anyway, as if the speaker is giving a play-by-play in the moment]” but are specific to only certain situations. 
"I was like, 'Marc Johns, what is your obsession with restoring archaic speech patterns and interfering with the natural progression of English from complex to efficient?'" envelopes all of these easily and is accessible and crisp, and allows for more variations on inflection than the others.
Of course, James is probably like, “I already fucking said that.” But eh, I tried adding on.

#linguistics #a.k.a. how I learned to stop worrying and love the evolution of the English language without being a discriminatory elitist jerk (via crystalandrock)

This a million times

themaefive:

axonsandsynapses:

yuletidekarkat:

dannygayhealani:

creatingaquietmind:

the speech impediment of the 21st century (by Marc Johns)

I’ll fuck you up buddy this is not a speech impediment it’s linguistic evolution!! the existence of the phrase “Aisha was like” allows the speaker to convey whatever Aisha said without making the listener assume they’re quoting Aisha directly while still maintaining the FEELING of what Aisha said.

ie, Aisha said she didn’t want to go out with me VERSUS Aisha was like, “I’d rather kiss a Wookie”.

the addition of “XYZ was like” lets the speaker be more expressive and efficient and it is a totally valid method of communicating information!!

With the way language has evolved, this is one of the few ways I can even think of to express in casual conversation what someone said. 

"So I said to Aisha," is certainly used, but if you remove the "so," which implies casual tone ("and" can be used in the same way), you get

"I said to Aisha," which is really formal in most English dialects/variations. I don’t know about all, but in New England dialects, you sound like you’re reading aloud from a novel.

"I told Aisha," is really only used when you continue to describe, not tell, what you told her. Ex: "I told Aisha that James was too punk for her" works while, "I told Aisha, ‘James is too punk for you’" crosses the line back into formalness of the "I said."

Things like “I asked” or “I answered [with]” are similar levels of casual and efficient to the “So, I said [or say, as many conversations about the past take place in present tense anyway, as if the speaker is giving a play-by-play in the moment]” but are specific to only certain situations. 

"I was like, 'Marc Johns, what is your obsession with restoring archaic speech patterns and interfering with the natural progression of English from complex to efficient?'" envelopes all of these easily and is accessible and crisp, and allows for more variations on inflection than the others.

Of course, James is probably like, “I already fucking said that.” But eh, I tried adding on.

  (via crystalandrock)

This a million times

(via lavidapoliglota)

harriettstella:

awkward-manatee:

that sound you can hear is the sound of us dropping out of university to pursue the successful modelling careers we were so obviously born for

true love

harriettstella:

awkward-manatee:

that sound you can hear is the sound of us dropping out of university to pursue the successful modelling careers we were so obviously born for

true love

(Source: awkward-manatea)

“Higgely-piggely,
Path is so wiggely,
Time is past four.
Almost dead beat
On tired little feet;
No friendly door.”

Tove Jansson, from her book Comet in Moominland (via allthingsmoomin)

“What if women had minstrel cycles instead of menstrual cycles? You’d just have a guy with a lute follow you around for a week every month and play you songs constantly?”

-My boyfriend (via thecarrionlibrarian)

Dear god, that would be EVEN WORSE.

(via lcn71)

(via profound-frustration)

(via thehufflepufffromgallifrey)

“and I am awaiting
perpetually and forever
a renaissance of wonder”

– Lawrence Ferlinghetti, from ”I Am Waiting”, in A Coney Island of the Mind (via the-final-sentence)

“Every introvert alive knows the exquisite pleasure of stepping from the clamor of a party into the bathroom and closing the door.”

– Sophia Dembling - The Introvert’s Way: Living a Quiet Life in a Noisy World  (via dianekrugers)

(Source: cumbered-cat, via awkward-manatea)

Inclement

Inclement

BY ALLISON TITUS

Snow and after, each bidding
and restlessness turns the goat’s heart
fallow: long hours of ice and bluster:
asymmetry of wind.
Say every goat has in its heart
a field, and each field, a goat:
the slumber of muscle and grass
is still a different elegy. Every
heart writes a different letter
of winter to its cold.
Icicles on sheet
metal, bucket frozen in the well.

Once there was no language
for the weather, just          The sky is low and birdless;
or The sky is a box of wings.
“All you have to do is write one true sentence. Write the truest sentence that you know.”

Ernest Hemmingway via justoutherepoeting

(how to write)

(Source: justoutherepoeting)

“It’s better to tell your money where to go than to ask where it went.”

– American proverb, taken from The Paradox of Generosity: Giving We Receive, Grasping We Lose, by Christian Smith and Hilary Davidson. (via oupacademic)

oupacademic:

The Oxford Companion to Food fact of the week

There are tensions between Australia and New Zealand as to which nation invented, and by extension named, the ‘pavlova’ which both countries name as their national dish. Unfortunately for Australia, much evidence seems to suggest that New Zealand did both.

Follow the #OxCompFood hashtag across social media for more delicious food facts from The Oxford Companion to Food.
Image: Pavlova, © fotografikas, via iStock Photo.

~not just tensionsWAR

oupacademic:

The Oxford Companion to Food fact of the week

There are tensions between Australia and New Zealand as to which nation invented, and by extension named, the ‘pavlova’ which both countries name as their national dish. Unfortunately for Australia, much evidence seems to suggest that New Zealand did both.

Follow the #OxCompFood hashtag across social media for more delicious food facts from The Oxford Companion to Food.

Image: Pavlova, © fotografikas, via iStock Photo.

~not just tensions

WAR